A Conversation with The Honorable David Miliband

David Milliband has always impressed me greatly. His transition into the world of NGO’s speaks volumes for his humanity. But listening to the conversation he had with the World Affairs Council confirms to me that we need him back in politics. What a huge mistake the labour party made?

A Conversation with The Honorable David Miliband
by World Affairs Council

Source: World Affairs Council

John Oneil’s “Future of Learning”

John Oneil has always been a visionary. Here he shares his vision of the “future of learning”.

Founders, fathers and daughters

Having the great pleasure of working with my daughter “Kat” made me greatly appreciate this article!

Founders, fathers and daughters
By Chris Tighe

Conversation flows effortlessly between John Elliott and Pamela Petty, as they talk in the boardroom at Ebac, a family-run manufacturer in north east England. They pick up each other’s points and explore tangential thoughts in easy exchange.

It is like listening to a family chat. And in a sense it is, because Mr Elliott and Ms Petty are father and daughter, as well as leading a team that aims to treble Ebac’s £20m an­nual turnover by reviving UK production of chest freezers and washing machines.

“Your strengths are more of an engineering background, mine are more business [and] numbers,” says Ms Petty, 46-year-old managing director and financial director, to Mr Elliott, 70-year-old chairman and founder. Product development is where Mr Elliott’s strengths lie, she says. “We think the best ideas come from dad.”

Mr Elliott, whose technical expertise made Ebac an early entrant into the dehumidifier and water cooler sectors in the 1970s, looks pensive: “I recognise I’m not a very good manager. I don’t finish things off.”

Ms Petty says: “I’ve never worried about whether somebody thinks I’m better than him or he is better than me. We’re different.” The age gap means he will always be more experienced but, she says, “there are probably some things I understand better”. She pauses, then says: “I can’t think of them.” But her father knows her strengths: “Your performance, your delivery,” he chips in.

Mr Elliott’s other daughter, Amanda Hird, arrives. As operations director she too spent years working her way up to senior roles at Ebac. “There are people who think you’re there because of who you are, [so] you have to build respect,” she says.

“Father & Son”, a familiar combination all over the world, has existed for centuries. “Father & Daughter” is rare. Yet, in recent years, fathers and daughters working together, sometimes with daughter eventually succeeding father, has become more common. This, says Denise Kenyon-Rouv­inez, a professor and co-director of IMD business school’s family business centre, is the case around the world.

Read full article here

Source: Financial Times, 01 July 2014

The Brain Regain by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum

An interesting article written by HH Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai.

It is insightful as it clearly sets out the strategy for the UAE and in so doing so highlights the difference with many other countries in the MENA region.

Enjoy reading…

The Brain Regain
by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum

DUBAI – In 1968, while studying at the Mons Officer Cadet School in the United Kingdom, I needed to visit a hospital. There I met a doctor who, to my surprise, spoke fluent Arabic. I learned that he was new to the UK, so I asked if he intended to stay long or return home. He replied with an Arabic saying that translates as: “My home is where I can eat.”

That doctor’s words stayed with me for many years, because they underscored the contradiction between our idealized view of “home” and the harsh realities of life that push talented people to leave their homes.

The doctor was a classic case of the “brain drain” phenomenon that has afflicted developing countries for decades. These countries spend scarce resources educating doctors, engineers, and scientists, in the hope that they will become engines of prosperity. Then we watch with dismay as they migrate to the West, taking with them the promise of their talent.

Click here to read the full article…

Source: Project Syndicate
www.project-syndicate.org
http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/mohammed-bin-rashid-al-maktoum-highlights-the-success-of-some-developing-countries-in-reversing-the-outflow-of-their-most-talented-people